LEAD 255 Perspectives on the American Revolution

Last offered Fall 2013

Cross Listed as HIST355
The American Revolution remains one of the most-studied events in American history. Yet, agreement about its main causes, significance, and purpose remains as distant as ever. Some historians argue that political ideas and principles brought about calls for Independence. Others emphasize the economic motives behind revolutionary fervor. Still others argue that British political institutions failed to adapt to the needs of a growing empire, leading colonists to replace British imperial rule with a form of government suited to their local exigencies. Some have told the story through the eyes of the Founding Fathers, while others have explored what the American Revolution meant for the lived experience of average citizens, of women, of free and enslaved African Americans, of Native Americans, and of peoples living beyond North America. Collectively, such a range of studies speaks to the significance of the American Revolution. Individually, however, these varying perspectives provide a fragmented picture of the era and its people. Through readings, lectures, and primary sources, this class will explore these different views of the Revolution and try to create some synthetic unity out of this historical kaleidoscope.
Class Format: lecture/discussion
Requirements/Evaluation: Evaluation will be based on class participation (20%), mid-term (20%) and final (25%) exams, and a final project (35%)
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Prerequisites: none; open to all
Enrollment Preference: History majors and Leadership Studies concentrators
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Divisional Attributes: Division II
Other Attributes: HIST Group F Electives - U.S. + Canada,HIST Group G Electives - Premodern,LEAD American Domestic Leadership,LEAD Facets or Domains of Leadership
Enrollment Limit: 25
Expected Enrollment: 20-25
Class Number: 1914
CLASSES ATTR INSTRUCTORS TIMES CLASS NUMBER
LEAD 255 LEC American Revolution Division 2: Social Studies Patrick K. Spero
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