HIST 328 Spring 2015 Witchcraft

Cross Listed as REL328
A wide variety of human cultures have accepted the existence of the supernatural, the reality of magic, and the possibility of magical transgression. Among the most common supernatural crimes is witchcraft, which societies can invoke to explain natural disasters and disease, and to blame these occurrences on specific individuals, often social outcasts. Witchcraft became a particular focus of fear and fascination in Early Modern Europe, when inquisitors, theologians and many ordinary people came to believe that Western Christendom was threatened by a vast, covert conspiracy of witches in league with the devil. Countless "witches"--most of them women--were accordingly tried, tortured and sometimes even executed. Our course will examine these bizarre events and consider what religious, cultural and intellectual factors might help explain them. We will begin by investigating the medieval legal and theological developments that enabled and encouraged the persecution of witches, and go on to study some of the most important and sensational witch trials of the later medieval and early modern periods. Throughout, we will encounter many strange and intriguing documents produced by the inquisitors who persecuted witches, the scholars who imagined their activities, and the laws that defined their crimes. No prior experience with European history is required for this seminar, which will emphasize thoughtful writing and discussion.
Class Format: seminar
Requirements/Evaluation: several short papers and a final, longer essay
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Prerequisites: none
Enrollment Preference: History and Religion majors
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Divisional Attributes: Division II
Other Attributes: HIST Group C Electives - Europe and Russia,HIST Group G Electives - Premodern
Enrollment Limit: 25
Expected Enrollment: 25
Class Number: 3245
CLASSES ATTR INSTRUCTORS TIMES CLASS NUMBER
HIST 328 - 01 (S) SEM Witchcraft Division 2: Social Studies Eric C. Knibbs
M 7:00 PM-9:40 PM 3245
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