Academic Resources

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Academic Resources is a number of services and programs that reside in various locations on campus designed to support students’ academic and intellectual engagement and to help them take full advantage of the curriculum. Our goal and higher purpose is to help students explore and take full advantage of Williams’ educational/intellectual opportunities of living and learning.

“The mission of Academic Resources is to help students go beyond SUCCEEDING at Williams to THRIVING at Williams.”

’68 Center for Career Exploration

At the ’68 Center for Career Exploration, we’re dedicated to the future success of Williams’ students, and that means helping them make the most of the time and opportunities right now. We’re students’ one-stop shop for career exploration, internship, job and graduate school searching, resume critiques, interviewing advice, and networking. It’s never too early to stop by for an appointment. Whether a student is an undeclared first-year or a senior ready for their first job in a chosen field, we’re here to help students explore, define, and achieve their career potential.

Students can get started exploring with the professional Career Advisors in:

Or, explore directly with alumni through the first-ever alumni career mentoring network, EphLink.

Students can walk in daily from 1:00-4:00 pm or make an appointment through Handshake.

In addition, we offer an extensive database of curated internships and jobs, funding for summer internships, and interview support. Each year the office organizes two large career fairs and over 120 employer campus visits. For more information or to subscribe to our monthly newsletter visit the ’68 Center for Career Exploration site.

Graduate Study and Professional Careers

Although Williams’ principal function is to provide a broad and solid liberal education that will be of lasting value no matter what vocation a student may pursue, Williams recognizes that no fundamental conflict exists between a liberal education and preparation for a professional career, on the contrary, a foundation of liberal studies increases professional competence in any field. A student should plan their program of study to provide as much educational breadth and enrichment as circumstances permit. A student should also give serious consideration to post-college plans early in their college career.

Each major provides the foundation for graduate study in the corresponding field. Students should consult with individual programs for requirements and for special advice regarding preparation for graduate study. Students should also consult with the appropriate faculty advisors as early as possible to make certain they have taken all the necessary factors into consideration.

Religious Study

There is no particular path through the Williams curriculum designed or recommended for students intending to prepare for a career as a religious professional, enroll in a seminary, or pursue theological education. Undergraduate study in many fields within the liberal arts curriculum can be useful to the prospective minister, priest, rabbi, imam, or teacher of religion.

Students with vocational interests that may include ordination or certification as a religious professional in a field such as chaplaincy, religious education, service to a congregation, faith-based humanitarian work or some other form of ministry are urged to make themselves known to one of the chaplains (or, where appropriate, one of the local clergy) as soon as these interests begin to come into focus. Ordination requirements vary widely depending on the particular religious community or tradition; in some cases, it may be possible to make progress on certain credentials in academic study or field experience during the college years. Many divinity schools and theological seminaries expect and welcome students whose understanding of “ministry” or sense of call is very much still in formation. A basic foundation in the study of religion is certainly helpful—sacred texts, scriptural languages, history, philosophy, phenomenology and comparative studies, etc. But undergraduate study in other disciplines—music and the arts, political science and economics, anthropology, psychology and sociology—may also enhance preparations at the graduate level for future service to communities of faith.

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